How I raised $1500 for Paws In Motion… and you can too!

by Pam Rempel, WHS Volunteer

I was surprised to see the total climb on my fundraising page for The WHS’ Paws In Motion fundraiser. Two years ago, I reached a whopping $45! Last year, I set my goal at $100 and my dad, supportive and motivating, pledged me that amount. He also challenged me to set my goal higher – a staggering $1000. I laughed at the idea, but decided to make it a ‘stretch goal’.

Two dogs pose for the camera at PIM 2013

Two dogs pose for the camera at PIM 2013

What did I do differently last year? I decided to overcome my shyness. I think it could be said that virtually everyone is uncomfortable with asking for money. No matter how valuable the cause, it is hard to ask. So I didn’t ask my friends and neighbours for money. I asked them to join my team and come have a really fun day. I printed up a flyer with photos of my dog, Sandy, and his bio, how The WHS helped him, and how grateful I am for it. On the flyer was the phrase Donate Now and an explanation of the purpose of  the needed funds. Out on walks, when Sandy stopped to meet a dog, I mentioned the walk and gave them a flyer. The donations began rolling in.

Then I went one step further, and it made the big money difference. I took my dog and my flyers to the businesses that I frequent in my neighbourhood. I offered to display their logo during the walk-a-thon on my back in appreciation for their support. Their business’ name would be mingling through the enormous crowd. I promised to follow-up in a week and got the name of the decision maker. When I returned, the generosity astounded me. Some even put out a jar and their staff members contributed. From $10 to $150, these companies were glad to sponsor Sandy, and I think meeting him helped make the connection.

A happy pup smiles after finishing his walk

A happy pup smiles after finishing his walk

So, can you do it? Can you get out of your comfort zone and mention the walk whenever someone asks what you’ve been doing lately, or what your plans are for the summer? Can you keep a few flyers handy for anyone you speak to who seems interested? Can you speak to potential donors about WHY you believe in and support this cause? If you can, then you can raise more than you ever thought you would.

A few things I did that anyone can do…

1)  In conversation, when asked about summer plans, mention prepping for PIM.

2)  Take your dog with you when you ask for support, or show a photo of your pets.

3)  Have a flyer with the details on it, and give them out to everyone.

4)  Ask businesses you frequent to support you and offer to promote them in exchange.

5)  Make conversation at the dog park, on walks, at appointments and invite everyone to join your team.

Ten things I did to raise $1500… and you can too!

1)  Decide not to be shy, and mention the walk whenever you’re asked what your plans are for the summer.

2)  Share your reason for participating, whether you are walking in memory of a beloved pet, or have adopted a pet.

3)  Have something tangible to give out always at hand, a flyer or business card with your donation website, the date and how to join your team, and distribute freely.

4)  Bring your dog or a photo of your pet with you when asking for support. It is surprising how generous people are when they are petting an animal.

5)  Follow-up on every contact because no reply doesn’t mean No. We are all busy and have big to-do lists.

6)  Encourage everyone who may want to come along that last minute enrollment is not too late. Advise them of pre-registration and event morning registration.

7)  Ask businesses you frequent to donate. Many companies are happy to support their regular customers’ charitable efforts. Putting the company’s logo on team shirts is simple to do with iron-on transfers and is a big motivator for the business.

8)  If you receive a donation in memory of a beloved pet, offer to dedicate your walk to their memory. Wear their name on the sleeve of team shirts if possible.

9)  Talk about the purpose of funds being raised. Fixing the problem of unwanted animals starts with controlling over-population with Spay & Neuter programs.

10)  The month after the walk is a great time to give out thank-you’s with your total funds raised. Involving your donors in your achievement lays the foundation for next year’s event.

What a great day! This pup rests in his owner's arms after his walk

What a great day! This pup rests in his owner’s arms after his walk

 

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Do’s and Don’ts for working at The Winnipeg Humane Society and with Wildlife in South Africa

by Ashley Henry

On May 20th, 2011, I received two phone calls that changed my life. In the morning I got a phone call from a representative for African Conservation Experience informing me that I had been accepted to travel to South Africa the next year to spend 6 weeks working with a wildlife veterinarian. In the afternoon, I received a call from the Shelter Manager of The Winnipeg Humane Society asking me to come in for an interview for a job that I considered a long shot to get. I felt pretty ecstatic but I don’t think that even I understood just how much those two phone calls were going to change my life.

I have been working at The Winnipeg Humane Society for nearly 3 years now and it has affected me in so many ways and so did traveling to South Africa. Here are a few insider tips for anyone curious about the life of an employee at The Winnipeg Humane Society.

1. Do make things work with whatever you’ve got.

  1. Photo credit: Ashley Henry, 2011
    Photo credit: Ashley Henry, 2011

We, as a charity, are often short staffed and we have to make do with what we have available. The same is true in South Africa. The ability to “roll with the punches” is essential for working in any field with animals, because whatever can go wrong, probably will.

2. Do prepare yourself to be dirty for the rest of your life.

Photo Credit: Fanny Morend, 2012

Photo Credit: Fanny Morend, 2012

I could never count the number of times that I have said “Oh darn, I have poop/boogers/pee/ vomit etc. on me.” Working with animals is a dirty job no matter how you spin it. When I was in South Africa it was winter time in the southern hemisphere and not incredibly warm outside as the sun was not very strong. But we would all have a day where we came home from some outing and said “Oh I finally got a little bit tan today,” and then the tan would wash off and we would realize that we were just very, VERY dirty.

3. Don’t assume you are safe with any pet (or animal) that you don’t know.

Photo credit: Stephanie Lacayo, 2012

Photo credit: Stephanie Lacayo, 2012

A minute before this photo was taken, I was thrown flying off of this giraffe, who had decided that he was no longer sleepy, or enjoying my presence on his neck. Many of the animals come into our care at the shelter and are very frightened by the new surroundings. This fear often makes them unpredictable. I always make an effort to fight my own fear and connect with the animals who scare me the most, because I know that they are more scared than I am.

4. Do have a sense of humor about dirty jobs and less than stellar situations

Photo Credit: Amanda Schaff, 2012

Photo Credit: Amanda Schaff, 2012

The ability to laugh at yourself and your situation is crucial when you find yourself covered in drool and acting as a pillow for a groggy buffalo. It’s also very necessary when we find ourselves dealing with loss in the shelter. Often when I tell someone where I work they say “I don’t know how you can do that.” My response usually is “I don’t know how I couldn’t do it now that I have done it.”

5. Do educate yourself on all aspects of the issues.

Photo Credit: Rebecca Maughn, 2012

Photo Credit: Rebecca Maughn, 2012

I want you all to meet Valentino. Valentino is a Southern White Rhino calf who was orphaned when his mother was poached for her horn. Valentino was sent to our farm to be cared for and he has since returned to living with his own kind. Rhino horn poaching is a major issue globally and is resulting in the extinction and endangerment of many rhino species. It is also resulting in the deaths of many people, as poachers and anti-poaching units carry automatic rifles and shoot to kill each other. “Poach the Poacher” is not the answer to this issue. What would you do to feed your family if you were desperate, as many in rural Africa are?

With most cases it is not our place to judge people for not being able to care for their pets anymore. It is our place to thank them for recognizing the point where a situation has gone beyond what they are able to handle. It is our place to ask them to give what they can and ask for no more. It is our place to give their pets the best possible chance at finding a new loving home where they can grow old.

Posted in Clinic, Staff, Volunteer | Leave a comment

Buddy: 18 years of love

Loving Buddy

by Rene Weinstein

I have been the fortunate owner of Winnipeg Humane Society dogs for over 30 years.  My most recent dog, Buddy, was adopted 18 years ago.  He was a white/apricot coloured terripoo with soft curly fur.  Buddy was loving and playful, and generous with kisses!

Buddy tackles a bone

Buddy tackles a bone

He came to me as an emaciated scruffy looking pooch with open sores and diesel oil on his back, but to me he was the most beautiful dog in the world.  He quickly settled in, put on weight, learned some manners, and was house trained within a week, and within three months he ruled the home!

Buddy loved to wear winter/rain jackets, and scarves; he wore a kerchief daily with themed designs for holidays.  He was especially fond of his Halloween ghost costume, which he wore for many years.  At the age of 16 years, he learned to wear winter booties, finally!

Buddy loved people, but not other dogs.  When on our walks which Buddy relished, he would whimper when big dogs came close, we eventually learned to yell out to approaching large dog owners – “Humane Society Dog!”  They immediately moved aside, conversation ensued about his situation, and many lasting street friendships were formed.

Buddy was constantly learning new things.  When he visited my friend’s mother he would hunt for his dog biscuits stored in a Tupperware container. Smart dog that he was, he snatched the entire container in his mouth, knowing he would receive more than one treat.

Buddy treasured his toys.  His greatest pleasure was removing the squeaky mechanism from all his new toys.  He would do this in a matter of  seconds then shake the daylights out of the toy.  He had a rope toy that we named Mr. Tug which he shook with great gusto, enjoying this activity for many years!  He had names for all his play things, remembered all their names and would fetch the identified toy, returning it to his toy box when finished.  He initiated play with his humans, amusing himself with different games from “rough house wrestle” to rope tugging.  He would growl and put on a great display of ferocity, and always won.

It wasn’t always fun and play, Buddy had chores too.  He assisted with sorting laundry and vacuuming.  He loved to be the first one on a newly laundered bed!  He once cared for a friend’s goldfish.  When the fish was put into a smaller bowl on a low table during a water change, Buddy delicately scooped it up in his mouth, however, not enjoying the movement in his mouth, he promptly spat the fish out.  The goldfish went on to live for a long time, and Buddy never tried sushi again!

He delighted in the warmth and heat of the solarium in the summer, smelling his flowers, stretching out in the sun, and watching his neighbours.  Everyone in the condo building knew Buddy and loved to stop and greet him,  he savored this attention and returned their greetings with tail wags and kisses.

When he eventually became blind and deaf, he continued to problem solve.  When he could no longer jump onto a piece of furniture, he would stand in front of it waiting for us to pick him up and put him on his favourite chair.  As Buddy aged, he liked the comfort and warmth of being bundled in a blanket, sleeping with his head on a pillow or teddy bear.

He was a very spirited and tenacious little fellow.  His vet admired this quality in him and told us this tenacity gave him the feistiness he enjoyed right up until his demise.  He was the oldest dog in her practice at the time of his death at aged 18, on January 15, 2014.

We will miss him dearly, and have donated his kennel and other assorted goodies back to The Winnipeg Humane Society.  He was the light of our lives!

Thank you, Winnipeg Humane Society!

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A Happy Valentine’s Story

The joys of fostering and adopting dogs – from puppies to seniors!

by Kristina Graham, WHS Assistant Manager of Retail Operations

For me dogs are like a fine wine, they just get better with age.  Sure, puppies are super cute. Their bouncy antics and clumsy playfulness are undeniably adorable, but they’re also a whole lot of work.

I grew up with a mom who wasn’t an avid dog lover (the rest of us slowly converted her). My father had a dog when they first met, and this canine companion was with them when my sister and I were born.   I have vague memories of this little rat terrier from my small childhood, but she passed away when I was only five.

I had to beg and bargain for almost four years before I finally succeeded in convincing my parents that our family needed another dog.  I was in the third grade and I insisted I could take care of a dog. I would walk him and feed him and clean up after him.  My parents would not have to worry about a thing. I crossed my heart, pinky swore and said a million pretty pleases with sugar and sprinkles on top.

I remember Valentine’s Day 1989 well because it was the day my wish was finally granted. I got to pick one puppy from a litter of squirming, cuddly fur-balls. My eye was instantly drawn to the runt, a little blonde bundle of cuteness that I appropriately named Valentine.

Valentine relaxes outside

Valentine relaxes outside

Of course as any parent can tell you, kids and their short attention spans are not the most reliable when it comes to pet care. So, as my mother predicted, my father ended up doing almost all of the training, feeding and walking of Valentine.  Thanks to the time and effort he put in with the dog, my dad and Valentine were the best of friends for 17 wonderful years.

In hindsight I can see that my sister and I were like fun toys that Valentine would occasionally play with until his provider, my dad, came home.  From that point on, he followed my dad loyally wherever he went.

Valentine snuggles up with his "provider"

Valentine snuggles up with his “provider”

As I got older, I had dreams of one day having that kind of bond with a dog of my own.  A few weeks after I purchased my first house, I found myself wondering if I was ready for another puppy.  I found a local rescue that was in need of a foster for two German Shepherd puppies. I agreed to take them in and socialize them until they were ready for adoption. Suddenly, I found myself the primary caregiver for two young, under-socialized, terrified 4 month old dogs with no training and no manners. Needless to say, I soon discovered that they weren’t the only ones with a whole lot to learn.

After months of gaining their trust, paper training, cleaning up messes, and trying to teach them not to be destructive (my poor base boards were ruined!), I found myself emotionally enriched but physically exhausted.  You could say I had an epiphany of sorts. While puppies were cute and fun, they were also a lot of hard work and responsibility. No wonder my parents didn’t believe me when I was a naive 8 year old.

Biggie the boisterous foster pup dips his toes into his water dish.

Biggie the boisterous foster pup dips his toes into his water dish.

Now, I am drawn towards the older dogs. When my husband and I were recently looking for a new addition to our pack, we agreed we would only consider dogs who were 5 years or older.  We figured this would give us a friend who was close to our other dogs’ ages and with a similar activity level.  While not every 5 year old dog is calm and quiet, we knew we had a good idea of what would be the best fit for our family. Armed with this knowledge, we began to keep our eyes and hearts open for the perfect match.

The great thing about mature dogs is that you already know exactly what their quirks are. On the other hand, puppies are still growing into themselves and learning through training (or sadly a lack thereof) who they will eventually become.  While it is rewarding to be a part of a puppy’s nurture and growth, I know there are hundreds of other people in the world eager to take on that challenge. Plus, puppies do a pretty good job marketing themselves with their youth and exuberance.

In my experience, older dogs are often passed up or overlooked because they aren’t as cute, cuddly or engaging. These dogs sit quietly in their kennels, patiently waiting for someone to see the true value of their calm, gentle ways. Often they are polite and unimposing, indicating that someone along their journey has taught them some manners. They are friendly and will lean against you for pets, but they no longer have the inclination to jump all over you and chew on your arms. They still have energy and enjoy walks in the park. They still like to play with toys and have their bellies rubbed, but they are also content taking a nap while you work on the computer, read a book or watch TV.  They like attention, they just don’t need it constantly.  These are the dogs for me.

On February 14 of last year, my husband and I found an older dog that was perfect for our pack. We discovered you can put a price on love in the form of an adoption fee. We brought home the perfect Valentine’s Day present from the Winnipeg Humane Society:  a 5 year old Shepherd mix named Lumberjack. After a year with the lovable lug, we can’t imagine our life without him.

Lumberjack strikes a pose.

Lumberjack strikes a pose.

Don’t get me wrong, I still love to see a cute puppy and will oooh and ahhh with the best of them whenever I do. But at the end of the day, I am so glad I don’t have to clean up their messes or teach them to be gentle and less destructive.  I am okay leaving this important job to some other loving soul with the patience of a saint. When I get home from work, I am content and happy when I see my three older dogs waiting eagerly at the door for me.  These beautiful old friends bring me joy, peace and an abundance of love.

Lumberjack the "loveable lug"

Lumberjack the “lovable lug”

 

 

Posted in Adoption, Foster, Staff | Leave a comment

Your photos: cat photo contest

The Internet is an incredible resource for research, interesting articles, and – perhaps most importantly – cat pictures!

Last fall, we asked our Facebook followers to submit pictures of their cats doing their favourite activities. Your response was overwhelming! You sent in oodles of great pictures – too many to fit on one page! We included some of our favourites in the Winter 2014 Newsletter and decided to post the rest of them here on The WHS blog.

So sit back, relax, and enjoy some wonderfully wacky pictures of cats at their best.

Baxter loves laying in the sun on his cat post.

Baxter loves laying in the sun on his cat post.

Beanz LOVES playing with string!

Beanz LOVES playing with string!

Billy likes taking naps with her big brother Oscar.

Billy likes taking naps with her big brother Oscar.

Bowser likes to hang out with his best friend Crash.

Bowser likes to hang out with his best friend Crash.

Coffee enjoys helping his owner knit (not!).

Coffee enjoys helping his owner knit (not!).

Dibbuk likes to sleep like a human.

Dibbuk likes to sleep like a human.

Eve likes to play with everything - including catnip mustaches.

Eve likes to play with everything – including catnip mustaches.

George and Kit Kat love to snuggle.

George and Kit Kat love to snuggle.

Herbert's favourite thing to do is have his fabulous self acknowledged.

Herbert’s favourite thing to do is have his fabulous self acknowledged.

Hydro likes to relax outside.

Hydro likes to relax outside.

Joey likes to lick his tail

Joey likes to lick his tail.

Lily loves to hide in cupboards.

Lily loves to hide in cupboards.

Mia loves to hang out in the grass in the summer.

Mia loves to hang out in the grass in the summer.

Mickie loves to soak up the sun in her bed.

Mickie loves to soak up the sun in her bed.

Milo's favourite thing to do is nap... stretch, yawn, nibble, repeat.

Milo’s favourite thing to do is nap… stretch, yawn, nibble, repeat.

Minie loves the squirrels

Minie loves watching the squirrels.

Penelope's favourite thing to do is people watch!

Penelope’s favourite thing to do is people watch!

Princess loves to snuggle up by the fire.

Princess loves to snuggle up by the fire.

Rusty loves posing for pictures.

Rusty loves posing for pictures.

Shadow does not like to wear costumes!

Shadow does not like to wear costumes!

Snuggling with their dog is a great pastime!

Snuggling with their dog is a great pastime!

Sofie is a little lady who loves to look pretty!

Sofie is a little lady who loves to look pretty!

Sylvester

Sylvester’s favourite thing is being groomed. He pushes his body into the brush, looking for more.

This cat enjoys rides in the stroller with his sister the chihuahua.

This cat enjoys rides in the stroller with his sister the chihuahua.

This cat loves to chill in her favourite room.

This cat loves to chill in her favourite room.

This cat thinks he's a penguin.

This cat thinks he’s a penguin.

This cat's favourite thing to do is chill with friends.

This cat’s favourite thing to do is chill with friends.

This cat's favourite thing to do is cuddle with her sister.

This cat’s favourite thing to do is cuddle with her sister.

This cat's favourite thing to do is meow at his owners until he gets a treat!

This cat’s favourite thing to do is meow at his owners until he gets a treat!

This cat's favourite thing to do is nap.

This cat’s favourite thing to do is nap.

This cat's favourite thing to do is nothing!

This cat’s favourite thing to do is nothing!

Tobey just likes to have a good time.

Tobey just likes to have a good time.

Xena loves to curl up with a good book.

Xena loves to curl up with a good book.

 

Thanks for sharing your photos! It’s always great to see adorable, friendly felines doing what they do best – being adorable.

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Broken shoulder doesn’t break foster parent’s spirit!

Kim Siwak is a teacher, a pet foster parent, and an all-around awesome human being. A couple months ago she broke her shoulder – “In the middle of September, the absolute worst time for a teacher!” she said with a laugh. Starting the school year off with a major injury was certainly less than ideal.

Unable to work, Kim suddenly found herself with lots of time on her hands. She continued to volunteer as a pet foster parent for The WHS, but also had to undergo rehabilitation to train her brain and hands to work together again by doing dexterity work.

Now here’s where her amazing spirit truly shines: instead of feeling sorry for herself because of her injury, Kim did something incredible. She brushed up on her old macramé skills from her teenage years, and started crafting custom dog and cat collars out of paracord – a strong, heavy-duty cord used for parachutes. Not only was she improving her dexterity, she was doing something wonderful for our shelter animals.

Paracord

A stylish pooch wears one of Kim’s collars

Kim sells the bracelets on Etsy for $10-$20, depending on the size. For every collar she sells, she donates one to The Winnipeg Humane Society. She types up personalized messages on a typewriter (which she specifically bought to help improve her dexterity) that lets the buyer know a collar has been donated to animals in our care.

Ashes

Ashes the cat is looking dapper in one of Kim’s collars!

Collars are customized to each buyer’s specification – you can choose a colour, size, and to add charms or rhinestones if you so desire.

The project is a joint effort, with Kim’s mom Carolyn pitching in to go shopping, watch for sales and clip coupons to help purchase the supplies needed for the collars.

Thank you Kim and Carolyn for your incredible efforts to help our animals! Cats like Ashes thank you for your support.

Ashes

Ashes models his collar while lounging in his condo

For more information on Kim’s custom collars, visit her Etsy shop: Custom Pet Collars.

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In Praise of Older Dogs: why one donor supports The WHS

A little over a month ago, Gail Holm made a great decision. She adopted a shelter dog from The Winnipeg Humane Society. And not just any shelter dog – Gail adopted Brandy, a big, beautiful lab/shepherd mix, the type of dog that’s relatively common around The Winnipeg Humane Society.

Brandy at home

Brandy at home

What wasn’t so common about Brandy was her age. At 11 years, she was ready to find a retirement home where she could spend her golden years. Senior pets sometimes have a harder time getting adopted. Small puppies or kittens are undeniably adorable, and have their whole lives ahead of them to spend with you.

Senior pets are a bit different. While they may be older, senior pets are open books — from the start, you’ll know important things like their full-grown size, personality and grooming requirements. They may not have the same energy as a younger pet, though they are just as lovable and deserving of a good home.

A happy adoption story

Gail is also a WHS volunteer who helps out at events like Paws for the Season. “I only volunteer for events at the moment because I didn’t think I could be around the animals up for adoption without being heartbroken that they don’t have a home to go to,” she said.

“I thought I was okay with that until I saw Brandy – and there was just something about her that I thought I had to do my best to give her a home. And I’m so glad I did – I am getting way more out of this relationship than Brandy is, and I think she is very happy.”

Indeed, Brandy had been patiently waiting for a forever home for over two months when Gail decided to take this lovely senior dog home, and into her heart.

Gail grew up on a farm, and her parents were animal lovers who instilled a deep love of animals in her from an early age. She’s been volunteering at The WHS for six years, doing her part to support the animals in her community.

Since bringing Brandy home, Gail has bought her a beautiful new doggy bed, but the stubborn pooch still prefers to sleep on the couch!

“Not once do you see a picture of Brandy on the special comfy, large Costco bed that was purchased for her,” said Gail. “Apparently that is only for short naps when there happens to be a sunbeam there. It is also a great holder for the bones and homemade dog treats that she is saving for nibbling on a little later.”

Brandy relaxes on the couch.

Brandy relaxes on the couch.

Gail’s love for Brandy is clear when she describes the dog’s antics and idiosyncrasies.

“Brandy was a bit timid when we first brought her home,” she said. “She wouldn’t let us know when she wanted to come back in the house from the yard, so I would have to go out there and actually bring her in. It took about three weeks but Brandy is now ‘knocking’ on the door to let us know she’s ready for some quality time in the house!”

Brandy plays in the snow

Playing in the snow

Brandy is also a great help in the kitchen. “She will let me know when it is obvious I have too much of a certain food item on the counter, and will request a taste test. She will be sure any spilled crumbs are taken care of so I don’t have to get the broom.”

Supporting The WHS – volunteering, adopting, donating

Gail happily supports The WHS – not only as a volunteer and an adopter, but also as a loyal donor.

“I don’t think there is a better place I could send any extra pennies to,” she said. “I have been telling family and friends to please send a donation to The WHS instead of getting me a gift because I know the money is going to such a great cause.”

It’s animals like Brandy, and the 8,000 to 9,000 animals The WHS receives per year, that benefit from your donations. When you donate to The WHS, you give animals like Brandy a second chance at happiness – at getting that love and support they need during their stay at the shelter, and the opportunity to find that perfect forever home with an owner like Gail.

“Thank you for giving Brandy a chance,” said Gail. “I’m really happy to have her, and the cat is not minding so much either!”

Brandy walking

You can see the love in her eyes!

You can support The Winnipeg Humane Society and help all the animals in our care. Click this link to help today, and let us know – why do you support The WHS?

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A Well-groomed Pet is a Healthy Pet!

Tropiclean shampoo

“Amelia hates baths.”

This was the warning I received from Amelia’s owner Adrienne on a summer Saturday afternoon, as we set out to give the six-year-old Pomeranian mix a much-needed bath after a week spent romping at the lake.

Indeed, no sooner had Adrienne turned on the water in the tub that Amelia began to whimper and look at us with the saddest of puppy dog eyes. After much cajoling (and a few treats), Adrienne got Amelia into the warm water and gently soaked her, dousing her thick golden fur in water.

Then it was Tropiclean time! Adrienne squeezed a small dollop of the aloe and oatmeal scented shampoo into her palm and set about giving Amelia a thorough scrubbing. By this point Amelia had calmed down, having seemingly accepted her fate, and even seemed to enjoy the bath!

Adrienne loved that Tropiclean is made of natural, organic ingredients that she can feel good about washing her dog with. “It rinses out really well, too,” she noted, as Amelia did her part to help and gave a good shake after hopping out of the tub.

Despite her long, thick hair, Amelia was almost completely dry just minutes after getting out of the tub and receiving a thorough towel dry from Adrienne! Adrienne was extremely pleased with the product, and especially enjoyed its natural ingredients and how easy it was to rinse out.

We chose the hypoallergenic aloe and oatmeal shampoo for Amelia, but Tropiclean comes in many other scents and styles, depending on your pet’s needs – from deep clean, deodorizing, white coated animals and more! The bottles are quite big (20 oz, or 592 mL) and a little goes a long way – a steal of a deal for only $14.99!

The Furminator

The next step in Amelia’s spa day was a once-over with the Furminator de-shedding tool. It became clear she wasn’t too keen on getting brushed, though she sat patiently as Adrienne ran the brush over her thick fur, painlessly pulling thick tufts of fur with every stroke.

By this point the other animal of the house, a big white cat named Jacob Marley, sauntered by to see what all the fuss was about.

Adrienne had previously warned me about JM and his shedding – “The whole apartment is covered in his fur,” she said. I knew the Furminator, which can reduce the amount of loose hair in your house by up to 90%, would have its work cut out for it with the furry feline.

Jacob Marley has short, thick hair, yet I was astonished with just how much fur was coming out with each stroke of the brush. He lay back, lavishing in the attention, and the dead fur came off him gently and easily.

Adrienne mentioned how much of a godsend the brush was – having two pets can be overwhelming enough, but with the help of the Furminator she’s found she has to vacuum much less in order to keep the place tidy and fur-free.

The Furminator is available in a variety of sizes and hair lengths, so you can choose the perfect one for your perfect pet. They range in price from $54.99 to $89.99.

Tropiclean Fresh Breath

From the makers of Tropiclean shampoo comes Tropiclean Fresh Breath, a product that promotes healthy gums and eliminates bad breath for up to 12 hours. I knew the perfect pet to try this product out on – my very own kitty friend, William.

William is fond of waking me up whenever he likes to be fed – which is usually around four o’clock in the morning – by walking over my pillow, gently pawing at my face, and ever-so-softly mewing, breathing his  less-than-pleasant kitty breath right up my nose.

Tropiclean Fresh Breath comes in several different flavours depending on the kind of pet you have and any issue they may have with their teeth and breath. I chose the one especially made for cats, which is veterinarian-recommended to fight periodontal disease. If anyone has ever tried to brush a cat’s teeth, you’ll know it’s not much fun (for you OR the cat!). This product makes it easy to reduce your pet’s plaque and tartar, and the subtle hint of mint will freshen their breath!

No more stinky morning wake-ups from William! After I added one tablespoon to his water, my furry friend lapped up his water like normal and didn’t seem to notice any difference in taste. For only $12.99 you get 16 oz or 473 ml of this great product, and as you only need a few drops at a time, it’s sure to last a long time!

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The Ghosts in Our Machine examines our relationship with animals

What are animals?

Are they sentient beings, who feel pain, pleasure, and attachment?

Or are they property – used solely for food and for clothing, medical research, breeding, and entertainment?

Film-maker Liz Marshall’s 2013 documentary The Ghosts in Our Machine argues that, while all animals deserve to be treated with respect, the majority of which are cruelly used as commodities or entertainment for humans.

The film follows photographer Jo-Anne McArthur over the course of one year, as she travels abroad to capture animal abuse through her lens. The audience witnesses McArthur’s triumphs in capturing rare, significant pictures of animals in fur and factory farms, as well as her exhaustion and sorrow of bearing witness to such cruelty.

Marshall has been making films since 1995 and uses her craft as a vehicle to communicate pressing issues, such as social justice, human rights, and environmental awareness. But The Ghosts in Our Machine is her first film focusing entirely on animal rights, an issue that’s been close to her heart for years.

“I’ve always been sympathetic to the plight of animals,” said Marshall over the phone from Toronto. “I’ve been a vegetarian since the age of 18, so I’m very sensitive to the topic and I wanted to try to the best of my ability to create a film that would reach a broad audience.”

Marshall knew the subject matter wasn’t typical for a mainstream audience. The Ghosts in Our Machine follows McArthur as she documents animals in abusive living situations – animals confined to tiny cages that cut up their paws and mouths, held in captivity before being slaughtered for fur.

Why, then, create a film that would be inherently hard to swallow?

“I was drawn to the challenge of it,” said Marshall. “I’m very aware that animal rights as an issue is a tough one for a lot of people to grasp or validate.

“Most people will say they care about animals, and yet a lot of those people don’t know about the issues that are explored in the film,” she said. “And they don’t necessarily want to know.”

Marshall said that although the use of animals is ingrained within our society, she believes this attitude is shifting, and that more and more people are becoming aware of animal rights and making ethical decisions as consumers.

The Ghosts in Our Machine is part of that zeitgeist that’s starting to emerge,” she said, of this growing support for animal rights.

A driving motivation for Marshall in creating the film was achieving balance between the more difficult scenes, with just as many “happy animal” stories.

“The film is not a graphic, violent film, and that was very deliberate. It doesn’t need to be – it still has integrity, but it didn’t need to show all of the graphic, violent details of what goes on.”

Indeed, there are just as many happy stories as there are sad in The Ghosts in Our Machine. It’s hard to watch as McArthur sneaks into European fur farms to photograph foxes and minks, their eyes large and hopeless and sunken in matted fur. But before we get too swept up in tragedy, Marshall’s narrative takes us to the Farm Sanctuary rescue shelter in upstate New York, where over 500 rescued farm animals are provided with the space, food, veterinary care, and love they deserve.

“It was important to illustrate the kind of reprieve for Jo-Anne, that she needed to recover from the field work, visiting Farm Sanctuary and being with happy animals. And in creating that sense of sanctuary for her in the movie, it also creates sanctuary for the audience,” said Marshall. “It’s an opportunity for the audience to catch their breath, to laugh, to feel good again.”

McArthur, who was diagnosed with PTSD in 2011 after extensive field work in documenting this abuse, thinks it’s important to use her talents and craft to expose larger issues.

“I realised I saw our relationship with animals in a different way than most people did,” said McArthur, also over the phone from Toronto. “I always had an empathy with their experience and I always had a great concern for animals.”

Though McArthur has been behind the lens as a professional photographer for 15 years, she had no problem stepping in front of the camera for this film.

“I decided long ago that I would put my face, my name and my words to the work that I do. There are a lot of good reasons why other activists don’t do that – safety reasons,” she said. But McArthur knows that her knowledge and experience make her a good spokesperson, and was more than willing to be the face of the message in this film.

The Ghosts in Our Machine has earned rave reviews, with many critics praising it both for its important message and beautiful cinematography. Marshall and McArthur are thrilled to be gaining more recognition for the plight of animals, even though it’s not an easy message to make accessible.

“To question the use of animals is very personal for people,” said McArthur. “To confront animal rights is to confront ourselves and our complicity in animals. And we all do, it’s really hard to avoid.”

The Ghosts in Our Machine premieres on the Documentary Channel this November, and will also be available on DVD in spring of 2014. For more information on the film and how you can help animals in your community and around the world, please visit theghostsinourmachine.com.

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WHS seeks your support for Responsible Pet Ownership By-Law

The City of Winnipeg is amending its current animal by-law and bringing forth a new Responsible Pet Ownership By-Law. On Thursday, July 4, WHS CEO Bill McDonald will represent The WHS at a standing committee at City Hall in support of this proposed By-Law.

These new amendments are important to Winnipeg for a number of animal issues. The most important is the provision on cat licensing. For the very first time, cats will have to be licensed in the City of Winnipeg. The net proceeds from the license fees collected will be provided to The WHS to expand our spay/neuter program.

The other significant provision in the By-Law concerns exotic animals. Once this By-Law passes City Council a section states, “the Chief Operating Officer does not have the authority to issue a special permit to authorize a travelling zoo, travelling exhibit or a circus from keeping or harbouring a prohibited animal while in Winnipeg.” This means no more circuses can come to town with any exotic animal, period!

Please contact the following City politicians and let them know you support the Responsible Pet Ownership By-Law, as they are the committee members that will first pass this important legislation. They are:

The message to them is simple: please pass this new Responsible Pet Ownership By-Law!

Thank you for your support of The Winnipeg Humane Society.

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